South Sudan: What you need to know

South Sudan Flag, 2013

Peace did not last long.

In December 2013, violence broke out in the capital, Juba, and quickly escalated to civil war.

Malakal, January, 2014. Photo: Nick Stanton

Today, 3 million South Sudanese have been forced from their homes. Over 1 million have fled the country.

Women and children cross a makeshift bridge over open sewage in the protection of civilian (PoC) site in Malakal, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

More than 1.8 million remain displaced inside South Sudan, with 50% estimated to be children.

A child at the protection of civilian (PoC) site in Malakal, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

Hundreds of thousands have sought refuge on UN peacekeeping bases in “protection of civilian” (PoC) sites.

The protection of civilian (PoC) site in Malakal, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

In February 2016, fighting broke out in the Malakal PoC, killing 25 and injuring 100. One-third of the camp was burned down.

Photo: Paul Jumurungi

One International Medical Corps team member was killed in the fighting.

International Medical Corps clinic, Malakal PoC, South Sudan, February 2016. Photo: IOM/Mohammed 2016

International Medical Corps’ health clinics were damaged and medical supplies were looted.

International Medical Corps surgery theatre, Malakal PoC site, February 2016. Photo: IOM/Mohammed 2016

Despite the fighting, our teams continued saving lives and delivered three healthy babies.

Photo: Joshua Jockio

Due to the relentless civil war, South Sudan’s economy has collapsed, and the price of basic commodities like food are soaring.

Patients in the waiting area of International Medical Corps’ primary health clinic in the protection of civilian (PoC) site in Malakal, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

Violence has also prevented many families from planting their crops.

A malnourished child eats therapeutic food, which is used to treat malnutrition, at International Medical Corps’ in-patient pediatric department at the protection of civilian (PoC) site in Juba, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

July 2016 saw an estimated 4.8 million people severely food insecure, with the number expected to rise in 2017.

A child is checked for malnutrition at International Medical Corps’ primary health clinic in the protection of civilian (PoC) site in Malakal, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

In 2016, there were also 3,500 cholera cases across South Sudan.

International Medical Corps’ cholera treatment center in one of the protection of civilian (PoC) sites in Juba, South Sudan.

All cholera patients treated by International Medical Corps in Juba survived.

Our team also provided lifesaving care during renewed violence in Juba, even after a shell struck our hospital.

Staff photo

…providing health care, psychological support, nutrition services, and gender-based violence prevention and support programs.

Patients wait to seek a health professional at International Medical Corps’ health facility in the protection of civilian (PoC) site in Juba, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

So far this year, we have reached more than 684,000 people. More than 35% of them are children under five.

Five-month-old twins Madit Garang and Nyaboth receive treatment for severe acute malnutrition in International Medical Corps’ stabilization center at the protection of civilian (PoC) site in Juba, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

Tragically, sporadic violence continues across South Sudan, signaling that the country’s humanitarian crisis will only deepen in 2017.

A woman in the protection of civilian (PoC) site in Malakal, South Sudan. Photo: Crystal Wells

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International Med. Corps

International Med. Corps

International Medical Corps relieves the suffering of those impacted by conflict, natural disaster and disease by delivering medical relief and training.